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Red Cross Holland Lab Marks 25 Years of Improving U.S. Blood Safety

Researchers helped protect blood supply while making donating blood safer for donors.

WASHINGTON, Feb. 21, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The American Red Cross is proud to recognize the 25th anniversary of its Jerome H. Holland Laboratory and its contributions to the body of research that have helped improve the safety of the nation's blood supply.

(Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20090108/RedCrossLOGO)

Research conducted at the laboratories in the Rockville, Md., area has led to several achievements, including:

  • Helping in the evaluation of testing and blood screening procedures for diseases such as HIV and hepatitis.
  • Spearheading research efforts which led to understanding the best testing approaches for preventing transfusion-transmission of West Nile Virus.
  • Collaborating with Red Cross blood regions to increase the safety of both blood donors and recipients.

This body of research has led to changes in the blood donation process, resulting in fewer complications for both people who give blood and patients receiving it. Lab scientists continue to study new and emerging pathogens affecting the blood supply.

"Scientists and doctors at Holland Lab work continuously to help ensure patients in this country have access to the safest, most reliable blood supply possible," said Roger Dodd, Ph.D., vice president, research and development for the Red Cross. "This is a great time to pause and reflect on all of the wonderful research done at the Holland Lab and throughout the Red Cross."

Red Cross research led to modified height and weight restrictions for young donors, which helped reduce adverse reactions among donors younger than 19. Red Cross participated in studies that revealed how plasma from female donors might carry antibodies which could cause transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). This led to providing male-dominant plasma for transfusions, reducing the occurrence of TRALI.

Red Cross scientists developed a technique for freezing red blood cells in 1971, which helps ensure a steady supply of red blood cells for patients with rare blood types and is still in use today.

In 1977, Holland Lab researchers participated in the development of a method of bar coding blood products in collaboration with the American Association of Blood Banks and the Council of Community Blood Centers, improving the tracking of blood products and confirmation of blood types.

The Red Cross established its national biomedical research program in 1961 and expanded it in 1987, with the creation of the Holland Laboratory. The legacy of Red Cross efforts to continuously improve blood collection processes and strengthen blood safety continues at the lab named for former Red Cross board chairman Jerome H. Holland even today.

About the American Red Cross:

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies more than 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or join our blog at http://blog.redcross.org.

SOURCE American Red Cross

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More Stories By Hariharan V Ganesarethinam

Global Head of Enterprise Architecture & Integration practice at Aspire Systems, responsible for delivering transformation projects and helping CxO, VPs to drive IT Architecture, strategies and innovations. He is also a Chief Architect of AURAS Platform, an unified architecture solution for Omni-Channel data integration. A book Author, Blogger, Conference Speaker and founder member of OpenEAGA (a non-profit advisory forum). Nearly 20 years of experience in Engineering, Architecture, Strategy, Integration and Information management with global enterprises. Specializations: • Enterprise Architecture, IT Strategy, Portfolio Management, Reference Architecture, Roadmap and Governance. • Enterprise Architecture Expertise in EA, SOA, MDM, Analytics and IoT. • TCO /ROI Analysis, P&L, Professional Service Management, Pre-sales, RFP / RFQ, Bidding and Engagement Management. • Retail, F&B, eCommerce, B2B, Research, Pharma and Media domains. • Product Platform Architecture, Product Development, Engineering, SDLC. Conference Presentations: • Open Group SFO 2016 – Topic “Need a Perfect Blend of EA and SOA for Global Information Flow” • WSO2Con USA 2015 – Topic “Rejuvenate Retail Integration for Limitless Possibilities” • NCOAUG Winter 2014 - Topic "Strategy for Empowering Enterprise Apps" • NCOUAG Conference 2013 – Topic: “Maximizing Apps Capabilities using Oracle SOA Suite” • NCOAUG Summer 2013 - Topic "Next Generation - Domain SOA" • Information Builders Summit 2010 – Topic: Service Re-usability Design for iWay ESB. Book Author: Oracle AIA Foundation Pack 11gR1:Essentials by Packt Publishing